CarriageTowneNews.com, Kingston, NH

Special Features

April 17, 2014

Restoring Your Property after a Long Winter

One of the best things about the dawn of spring and the return of warmer weather is the chance to get out of the house and get some fresh air. For homeowners, this is the perfect opportunity to assess any damage the previous months did to yards and develop a plan restore properties.

* Don’t jump the gun. The first warm day of spring might seem like a great time get out in the yard and get your hands dirty. But it’s best to wait until the grass has completely dried out before getting to work. Raking on wet grass increases the risk of tearing out grass, which can cause bald spots and the growth of weeds down the road. In addition, stepping on the grass while the ground is still wet can compact the soil, which can slow drainage and block the lawn’s roots from breathing.

Patience should prevail with regard to mowing the lawn as well. A lawn’s roots will not start to grow until the average everyday temperature routinely reaches 40 F, so mowing too early is both unnecessary and potentially harmful to the lawn. When the temperatures regularly reach 50 F, then homeowners will likely start to see their lawns growing.

* Remove debris that’s piled up. Debris has a tendency to infest a yard over the course of the winter months. Fallen branches, stones and even trash can accumulate in a yard, putting those who spend time in the yard at risk of injury once the warm weather returns. For instance, bits of twigs and pebbles that are blown across the yard during a windy winter can be embedded in the yard, making the yard less of a haven and more of a hazard. Once the grass is dry enough to walk on, walk around the property and remove any debris that’s piled up over the last few months.

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