CarriageTowneNews.com, Kingston, NH

Special Features

April 10, 2014

Understanding Condensation in Your Home

(MS) - What do houseplants, a boiling pot of pasta and your shower all have in common? They all add moisture to your home’s interior. And, while some humidity in the home is good, excessive moisture can be uncomfortable.

“We often get calls from homeowners who are concerned that their windows are ‘sweating’ or leaking either inside or outside the home because they see moisture on the glass,” says Christopher Burk, technical product manager at Simonton Windows(R). “In reality, that’s simply not the case. While condensation may collect on the interior or exterior of energy-efficient windows, the units are really doing their job by helping serve as a barrier in the home.”

Burk points out that windows do not cause condensation - they simply prevent the moisture in the home from escaping to the outside.

“If the inside glass surface on double- or triple-glazed windows show excessive moisture, you can be reasonably sure that the moisture is also collecting on your walls and ceilings,” says Burk. “This means you should take steps to reduce the humidity level in your home by using exhaust fans and dehumidifiers.”

Where Does Condensation Come From?

You’d be surprised how much water vapor homeowners create themselves on a daily basis. A family of four can add a half pint of water vapor every hour to the home just through normal breathing and perspiration. And, if you take a five minute shower, you produce another half pint of water vapor. Even the simple act of cooking dinner on a gas stove can produce two and a half pints of water vapor.

“Invisible water vapor is everywhere in the home,” says Burk. “The key is for homeowners to monitor the levels of moisture in their homes and then take steps to manage the humidity levels.”

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