CarriageTowneNews.com, Kingston, NH

Special Features

September 26, 2013

How to Choose Replacement Windows

Replacement windows have become a very popular option for those homeowners who want to upgrade their existing windows.

Two of the benefits of replacing windows are gaining energy efficiency through Low-E or High-Performance glass and improved weather-stripping, and tilt-in sashes for easy cleaning.

There are two types of replacement windows: a full-frame and an insert frame replacement. The Full-frame requires the entire existing window frame to be removed, thus disturbing the interior walls and casings as well as the exterior trim and possibly the siding. The insert type is just that, an insert. This replacement window is designed with a narrow or “mini” frame and new tilt sashes that sits within the existing window frame, not affecting walls and trims. This option does slightly reduce the glass size of the windows the insert is replacing. Insert replacement windows can be custom sized to the nearest eight of an inch to ensure the highest degree of fit between the window and the existing frame. Multiple sill angles are available to provide an accurate fit and a clean exterior appearance.

Andersen® windows offer the Woodwright® insert window which accomplishes both energy efficiency and tilt-wash sashes, while maintaining a traditional New England Style double-hung. The Woodwright insert double-hung window® has a vinyl clad low-maintenance exterior and an all wood interior with precision craftsmanship helps Woodwright windows blend well to the original units in many period homes. The Woodwright double-hung window® is an excellent solution for owners of older homes who want to update the performance of their windows, but are unwilling to compromise the aesthetic and architectural elements for their original windows.

Andersen® windows offer different offerings on their High-Performance Low-E glass. Low-E glass is a sealed system for optimum insulation from heat and cold, as well as sound being transmitted through the glass.

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