CarriageTowneNews.com, Kingston, NH

Online Extras: News to Note

February 23, 2013

6 ways to tell if you're staying in a murder hotel

NEW YORK — This January, a 21-year-old Canadian tourist named Elisa Lam disappeared while visiting Los Angeles. Lam was last seen at the Cecil Hotel in downtown Los Angeles, where she had been staying.

Tuesday, her body was found at the bottom of one of the hotel's rooftop water tanks, thus solving two separate mysteries at once: "What happened to Elisa Lam?" and "Why is the water pressure so bad at the Cecil Hotel?"

The hotel's guests were horrified at the news, with good reason — nothing spoils a vacation faster than learning you may have been brushing your teeth with corpse-water.

But anyone familiar with Los Angeles' history couldn't have been too surprised. Downtown L.A. has long been seedy, and somewhat dangerous; the Cecil Hotel, for its part, has a long and sordid criminal history.

The Cecil doesn't advertise its dark past; caveat emptor and all that. But, still, many guests might balk at staying in a hotel that was once a crime scene. It's best if you do your research before embarking on your travels, not after. Here are some ways to determine whether or not you might have booked a room in a murder hotel.

The hotel is also a residential hotel.

Half the time, people who live in hotels are either eccentric millionaires or adorable, adventure-prone children. The rest of the time, they are usually creepy drifters. Sometimes it's hard to tell which is which, so corpse-wary travelers should play it safe and avoid hotels that court the long-term trade. The Hotel Chelsea, where Sid Vicious allegedly killed Nancy Spungen in 1978, was also a long-term residential hotel. The Cecil is one, too; a Los Angeles Times article about the Lam case featured quotes from an 89-year-old man who has lived in the Cecil for 32 years. A hotel like this is probably not the sort of place you want to stay, unless you are a character in a Charles Bukowski novel — in which case, congratulations on magically coming to life!

Text Only
Online Extras: News to Note

New England News
Obituaries
  • Jo Ann Hughes, 79

    Sandown, NH — Jo Ann (Phelps) Hughes of Sandown, New Hampshire passed away on Thursday, March 27, 2014, surrounded by all of her children at home. She was born in Little Bend Kentucky, to Beatrice (Shepherd) Phelps and John (Cat) Phelps in 1934. Jo Ann was predeceased by brothers, Marcus Phelps, Johnny Phelps, Forrest Phelps and sisters, Juanita Phelps, and Jeanette (Phelps) Vincent. She is survived by brother, Donald Quiggins of Georgia; sisters, Geneva (Phelps) Stanley of Kentucky, and Frances (Phelps) Bratcher of Tennessee who had just visited Jo Ann in September of 2013.

    Continued ...
    The Carriage Towne News Thu, April 10
    6 days
  • Margaret F. (Harrington) Kinney, 107

    Atkinson, NH — Margaret F. (Harrington) Kinney, 107, a resident of Atkinson for eighty-two years, died peacefully at her home surrounded by her loving family.

    Continued ...
    The Carriage Towne News Thu, April 03
    13 days 1 Photo
  • Laura L. Day, 79

    Newton, NH — Laura L. (Hartford) Day, 79, of Newton, NH, died Sunday evening, March 16, at Kindred Hospital, Peabody.

    Continued ...
    The Carriage Towne News Thu, March 27
    20 days
  • Norman Sansoucie, 77

    East Kingston, NH — Norman P. Sansoucie, 77, died on March 3, 2014, at the Clipper Harbor Nursing Home in Portsmouth, NH. He was born on May 29, 1936, in Haverhill, MA, son of William and Albertine (Beauparlant) Sansoucie.

    Continued ...
    The Carriage Towne News Thu, March 20
    27 days
  • John Colby, 76

    Brentwood, NH — John Ellsworth Colby, 76, formerly of Sandown, N.H., and Brownville, Maine, died on February 22, 2014, at the Rockingham County Nursing Home, after a lengthy illness. Born in Keene, N.H., Mr. Colby was the first son of the late Russell and Edythe Colby of Bradford, Mass. His brother, Dr. David R. Colby of Beaufort, N.C., predeceased him as well. Mr. Colby graduated in 1955 from Haverhill High School and attended Northeastern University and Wentworth Institute of Technology. He was a well known home designer and builder, and furniture craftsman, particularly known for his ability to create beautiful curved staircases. He was the founding production manager of both Westville Homes Corporation of Plaistow, N.H., and Xyloid Corporation of Greenville, Pa.,, pioneers in the modular home industry. He was also proprietor of the Westville Getty service station in Plaistow in the 1970s, and co-owner and occasional driver of the “1/5 Schenley Special” stock cars that raced, from 1968 to 1989, at Star in Epping, N.H., Lee, N.H., Hudson, N.H., and Westboro Mass., speedways.

    Continued ...
    The Carriage Towne News Thu, March 13
    34 days

Stocks