CarriageTowneNews.com, Kingston, NH

Letters to the Editor

November 8, 2012

Affordable Care Act Too Costly

Although the Supreme Court deemed the Affordable Care Act constitutional, it must not go into effect. With the debt that America faces, we cannot afford to undertake the proposed near one trillion dollar plan. With the already soaring taxes, Obamacare will add additional expenses, which will financially affect all families. For example, according to the American Economic Journal, anyone not buying qualifying health insurance must pay an income surtax. The Affordable Care Act will place taxes on individuals, families, hospitals, and even tanning salons. The plan itself and corresponding tax hikes will add a tremendous amount of debt to Americans.

Congress still needs to reform the current healthcare system, accommodating to the growing needs and rising costs. However, the Affordable Care Act does not take into consideration the growing cost of health care. New Hampshire Senator Kelly Ayotte states, “by imposing a coercive tax on Americans, Obama’s healthcare law represents an unprecedented federal overreach into individuals’ personal lives, failing to solve the fundamental problem with the nation’s healthcare delivery system-skyrocketing cost of care”. In developing a healthcare proposal, Congress must consider measures to reduce cost of care by focusing on changing behaviors, such as obesity, which has greatly attributed to healthcare spending.

Health care is one of the most important issues currently facing Americans. Therefore, if the plan is going to affect all Americans, then it must pass with bipartisan support. The majority of United States citizens disapprove of the act. Therefore, Congress must work collaboratively to adopt a healthcare plan. Implementing an expensive and controversial plan that calls for multiple tax hikes during one of America’s most economically depressed periods is wrong and will add to the debt that the country faces.

Adam Gilman

Hampstead

 

 

 

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