CarriageTowneNews.com, Kingston, NH

Letters to the Editor

May 8, 2014

Investigate Intrigues of Supreme Court

Investigate Intrigues of Supreme Court

Several decades ago, I considered the Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) to be the last bastion of American democracy, and therefore, the protector of the republic. Of course, SCOTUS had made some errors; for example, judgments involving black civil rights laws. These false decisions were overturned in subsequent pronouncements.

The Supreme Court (SC) has always been a political football, but starting with the 2000 presidential election, the SC seemed to drift into uncharted waters. In a 5-4 decision, the SC summarily ended a recount of the votes cast in Florida that was ordered by the Florida Supreme Court. Via the same decision, SCOTUS held its own de facto presidential election which declared George W. Bush the new President of the United States; the plurality was five votes to four.

Prior to the 2000 election, the SC started negating the will of the people, via their elected representatives, relative to campaign finance laws intended to level the playing field between average citizens and rich supporters of candidates. In the Buckley v. Valeo case of 1976, the SC declared that money in elections is free speech.

In 2010, the SC unilaterally introduced new issues into the Citizens’ United v. Federal Election Commission (FEC) case that were not raised at the initial hearing, violating the Court’s own procedures. After expanding the issues, SCOTUS heard the case again. The 5 to 4 decision overturned a section of the 2002 Campaign Finance Reform Act that prohibited unions and corporations from spending vast sums of money on campaign advertising in federal and state elections. It also gave corporations a new status, that of a person. This decision opened the floodgates; billions are now expended on national elections, and interfere in the states as well.

This year, the SC in its McCutcheon v. FEC decision wiped out the $117,000 aggregate campaign contribution cap (by an individual) in a two year election cycle. Now that the cap is gone, the wealthy can contribute $2,600 in each election to any and all individual candidates of their choice and $5,000 to any political action committee they choose to support.

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Obituaries
  • Alan J. Walker, 68

    Kingston, N.H. — Mr. Alan James Walker, 68, passed away peacefully at his home on July 8, 2014, after a long, brave battle with cancer.

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  • James Reese

    Raymond, NH — James Edwin Reese, 74, passed away on Wednesday, July 16, 2014, surrounded by his family and friends at his home in Raymond, N.H. He was the son of John and Ruth Reese, born on Oct. 29, 1939 in Edensburg, Pa. James graduated from Central Cambria High School in Pennsylvania before proudly serving in the U.S. Army as a food inspector. His military service was followed by 31 years with the U.S. Department of Agriculture as a meat inspector. Mr. Reese was an avid outdoorsman and spent much of his time fishing, camping and hiking in the White Mountains. He became involved in the Boy Scouts and enjoyed passing on his vast knowledge of the wilderness to others. Throughout his retirement years he enjoyed woodworking, raising rabbits and working in his garden.

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  • Velma J. Reid

    South Hampton, NH — Velma J. Reid, 80, died peacefully on July 17, 2014 at Exeter Hospital, surrounded by family. She was born in Haverhill, Mass. on June 8, 1934, the daughter of the late George C.W. and Alta I. (Kimball) Haynes. A graduate of Haverhill High School, Velma worked at Western Electric until she had children. For years, she was a devoted “stay-at-home” mom who raised her three children in a loving, nurturing environment. She later worked various manufacturing jobs until her retirement. After retiring, she volunteered her time at various organizations and was very involved at the East Kingston Community United Methodist Church as a member of the women’s guild, assisting with the holiday fair, and helping out wherever she could. She had a passion for animals, and would donate money, food, and blankets to the NH SPCA. She loved to sew and made a personalized quilt for every member of her family. She was also a member of the “Ugly Quilts” group, which made blankets and sleeping bags for the homeless using recycled fabric. She is survived by her husband, Clyde Reid of South Hampton, N.H.; daughter, Pam Eaton of Danville, N.H.; son and daughter-in-law, Douglas and Kim Reid of Raymond, N.H.; daughter, Shirley Reid of South Hampton, N.H.; two sisters, Gwen Stuart of Haverhill, and Norma Taplin of Dracut; four grandchildren, Cheryl and Marc Welch, and Kristen and Joshua Reid, and several nieces and nephews.

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  • Carleen A. Knowlton, 80

    Danville, NH — Carleen A. (Rhoadhouse) Knowlton, 80, of Danville and formerly of Hampstead, died on July 7, 2014, at her home.

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  • Miriam O. (Graham) Graham, 84

    Kingston, NH — Miriam O. (Graham) Graham, 84, a resident of Kingston since 2001, and former longtime resident of Grafton, Mass., died peacefully, surrounded by her family, on July 11, 2014, following a long illness.

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