CarriageTowneNews.com, Kingston, NH

Letters to the Editor

December 19, 2013

Our Democratic Republic

Our Democratic Republic

Recently, I have noticed a disturbing development in one of our two political parties. Conservatives, usually represented by the Republican Party, seem to be losing their faith. That is, they are losing their faith in democracy. If true, this would be quite a fall from grace for a party whose first President defined democracy as a “government of the people, by the people, for the people.”

Numerous signs attest to this drift away from democracy, but especially alarming are the attempts by those states run by Republican majorities to limit access to the vote. Examples of these include new voter ID laws, fewer days allotted to voting, reduction in the number of polling places, and placement of polling places in inconvenient locations. In a few cases, Republican politicians have committed “gaffs” by boasting that their new voting restrictions would help them win elections. But most Republicans maintain discipline and stick to the party line that they are only trying to protect the vote. Sure.

But sometimes conservative writers, including the writer of a letter to this paper on November 28 (“Delayed Response”), state quite plainly that the United States was not intended to be a democracy. She said that we are instead a “Constitutional Republic.”

But why can’t a nation be both a republic and a democracy? And what would she substitute for rule by the people? Plutocracy? Aristocracy? Theocracy? Over the centuries, all these forms of government have been tried and found to result in bloodshed and tyranny.

I can understand why many conservatives are nervous about democracy. Things are changing rapidly in our country. Changing especially rapidly is the demographic make-up of what our Constitution calls “We the People.” Conservatives do not like change and are programmed to resist it, especially changes in our definition of who is a citizen (Thus, the resistance to immigration reform). Many conservatives try to divine the “original intent” of the 18th century gentlemen who wrote the Constitution. But this is a mistake. Remember, those gentlemen would not allow black Americans to vote, nor women of any color, or even most white men.

Text Only
US Politics
Obituaries
  • Alan J. Walker, 68

    Kingston, N.H. — Mr. Alan James Walker, 68, passed away peacefully at his home on July 8, 2014, after a long, brave battle with cancer.

    Continued ...
    12 hours
  • James Reese

    Raymond, NH — James Edwin Reese, 74, passed away on Wednesday, July 16, 2014, surrounded by his family and friends at his home in Raymond, N.H. He was the son of John and Ruth Reese, born on Oct. 29, 1939 in Edensburg, Pa. James graduated from Central Cambria High School in Pennsylvania before proudly serving in the U.S. Army as a food inspector. His military service was followed by 31 years with the U.S. Department of Agriculture as a meat inspector. Mr. Reese was an avid outdoorsman and spent much of his time fishing, camping and hiking in the White Mountains. He became involved in the Boy Scouts and enjoyed passing on his vast knowledge of the wilderness to others. Throughout his retirement years he enjoyed woodworking, raising rabbits and working in his garden.

    Continued ...
    12 hours 1 Photo
  • Velma J. Reid

    South Hampton, NH — Velma J. Reid, 80, died peacefully on July 17, 2014 at Exeter Hospital, surrounded by family. She was born in Haverhill, Mass. on June 8, 1934, the daughter of the late George C.W. and Alta I. (Kimball) Haynes. A graduate of Haverhill High School, Velma worked at Western Electric until she had children. For years, she was a devoted “stay-at-home” mom who raised her three children in a loving, nurturing environment. She later worked various manufacturing jobs until her retirement. After retiring, she volunteered her time at various organizations and was very involved at the East Kingston Community United Methodist Church as a member of the women’s guild, assisting with the holiday fair, and helping out wherever she could. She had a passion for animals, and would donate money, food, and blankets to the NH SPCA. She loved to sew and made a personalized quilt for every member of her family. She was also a member of the “Ugly Quilts” group, which made blankets and sleeping bags for the homeless using recycled fabric. She is survived by her husband, Clyde Reid of South Hampton, N.H.; daughter, Pam Eaton of Danville, N.H.; son and daughter-in-law, Douglas and Kim Reid of Raymond, N.H.; daughter, Shirley Reid of South Hampton, N.H.; two sisters, Gwen Stuart of Haverhill, and Norma Taplin of Dracut; four grandchildren, Cheryl and Marc Welch, and Kristen and Joshua Reid, and several nieces and nephews.

    Continued ...
    12 hours 1 Photo
  • Carleen A. Knowlton, 80

    Danville, NH — Carleen A. (Rhoadhouse) Knowlton, 80, of Danville and formerly of Hampstead, died on July 7, 2014, at her home.

    Continued ...
    7 days 1 Photo
  • Miriam O. (Graham) Graham, 84

    Kingston, NH — Miriam O. (Graham) Graham, 84, a resident of Kingston since 2001, and former longtime resident of Grafton, Mass., died peacefully, surrounded by her family, on July 11, 2014, following a long illness.

    Continued ...
    7 days 1 Photo

Stocks