CarriageTowneNews.com, Kingston, NH

Community News Network

November 1, 2013

5 myths about the Affordable Care Act

"Frustrating." A "debacle." That is how President Barack Obama's own secretary of health and human services, Kathleen Sebelius, has described the rocky launch of HealthCare.gov. Americans were supposed to begin shopping for insurance coverage on Oct. 1, but millions have been unable to log into the federal online exchange. Congress, meanwhile, shut down the government for 16 days in a dispute over whether to fund the health-care law. As the debate continues, let's look at some of the most persistent myths about the law — and some new ones that have cropped up.

1. Americans will be forced to buy health insurance.

The health-care law's individual mandate, despite its name, isn't meant to force Americans into health plans. Instead, it is supposed to encourage people to purchase coverage by giving them two options: Buy insurance or pay a fine. In 2014, that fine is $95 or 1 percent of an individual's income, whichever is higher.

The Internal Revenue Service is responsible for collecting this penalty from individuals who indicate on their annual tax filings that they have not purchased coverage. The agency can take the penalty out of a filer's refund, but beyond that, its ability to recoup those dollars is extremely limited. The IRS cannot, for example, send agents to people's homes or put liens on their houses. In the health-care law, Congress specifically curtailed the ability to enforce this penalty, giving the IRS fewer ways to collect it than there are for other tax fines.

2. If you like your health plan, you can keep it.

Obama has repeatedly made this key promise about his signature legislation. "If you're one of the more than 250 million Americans who already have health insurance, you will keep your health insurance," he said in June 2012, shortly after the Supreme Court upheld the law.

Text Only
Community News Network

New England News
Obituaries
  • Jo Ann Hughes, 79

    Sandown, NH — Jo Ann (Phelps) Hughes of Sandown, New Hampshire passed away on Thursday, March 27, 2014, surrounded by all of her children at home. She was born in Little Bend Kentucky, to Beatrice (Shepherd) Phelps and John (Cat) Phelps in 1934. Jo Ann was predeceased by brothers, Marcus Phelps, Johnny Phelps, Forrest Phelps and sisters, Juanita Phelps, and Jeanette (Phelps) Vincent. She is survived by brother, Donald Quiggins of Georgia; sisters, Geneva (Phelps) Stanley of Kentucky, and Frances (Phelps) Bratcher of Tennessee who had just visited Jo Ann in September of 2013.

    Continued ...
    The Carriage Towne News Thu, April 10
    6 days
  • Margaret F. (Harrington) Kinney, 107

    Atkinson, NH — Margaret F. (Harrington) Kinney, 107, a resident of Atkinson for eighty-two years, died peacefully at her home surrounded by her loving family.

    Continued ...
    The Carriage Towne News Thu, April 03
    13 days 1 Photo
  • Laura L. Day, 79

    Newton, NH — Laura L. (Hartford) Day, 79, of Newton, NH, died Sunday evening, March 16, at Kindred Hospital, Peabody.

    Continued ...
    The Carriage Towne News Thu, March 27
    20 days
  • Norman Sansoucie, 77

    East Kingston, NH — Norman P. Sansoucie, 77, died on March 3, 2014, at the Clipper Harbor Nursing Home in Portsmouth, NH. He was born on May 29, 1936, in Haverhill, MA, son of William and Albertine (Beauparlant) Sansoucie.

    Continued ...
    The Carriage Towne News Thu, March 20
    27 days
  • John Colby, 76

    Brentwood, NH — John Ellsworth Colby, 76, formerly of Sandown, N.H., and Brownville, Maine, died on February 22, 2014, at the Rockingham County Nursing Home, after a lengthy illness. Born in Keene, N.H., Mr. Colby was the first son of the late Russell and Edythe Colby of Bradford, Mass. His brother, Dr. David R. Colby of Beaufort, N.C., predeceased him as well. Mr. Colby graduated in 1955 from Haverhill High School and attended Northeastern University and Wentworth Institute of Technology. He was a well known home designer and builder, and furniture craftsman, particularly known for his ability to create beautiful curved staircases. He was the founding production manager of both Westville Homes Corporation of Plaistow, N.H., and Xyloid Corporation of Greenville, Pa.,, pioneers in the modular home industry. He was also proprietor of the Westville Getty service station in Plaistow in the 1970s, and co-owner and occasional driver of the “1/5 Schenley Special” stock cars that raced, from 1968 to 1989, at Star in Epping, N.H., Lee, N.H., Hudson, N.H., and Westboro Mass., speedways.

    Continued ...
    The Carriage Towne News Thu, March 13
    34 days

Stocks