CarriageTowneNews.com, Kingston, NH

Community News Network

December 13, 2013

Free at last from the clutches of Toys `R' Us

WASHINGTON — "I am free."

The thought pierced my cold, dark consciousness as I crossed a desolate commuterscape toward an early-morning train.

Before exiting my parked car, I had rifled through sections of the New York Times in case of momentous news out of Syria, Park Slope or Madison Square Garden. Instead, I found something grimly unnerving: an insert, bathed in blue and orange hues, that seemed hideously familiar. Dear God. Toys "R" Us was back.

"Door Busters!" the insert shrieked, with the R in "Door" reversed in dull homage to the illiteracy that, along with cheap crap from China in perpetuity, is one of the twin towers of the Toys "R" Us Inc. brand. My eyes locked on "My Talking LapPup," available in "Violet" or "Scout." Fisher-Price Inc.'s "Bedtime Peppa Pig" beckoned from an adjacent coupon panel. At the bottom of the first page -  oh, yes, there were six -  was a warning that the "Buy 1 Get 1 40% Off Mix & Match SALE!" had only two days to go. Violent video games, bad movies and various branded detritus from the plastics factory would soon experience a devastating price spike.

Panic had begun to seize me when a beautiful moment, the kind you can own and recall over the course of an entire lifetime, materialized out of the frigid air itself. "I have teenagers," I realized. "Put down the insert. It's over."

My cherished daughter, who once pined for a "Hop Along Pink Pony" -  the desperate purchase of which, at the last minute on Dec. 24 after weeks of hopeless searching, had pitched her mother into triumphant, transcendent bliss -  simply doesn't care anymore. My son, whose contributions to the plastics industry dwarf anything Deng Xiaoping ever mustered, would like some nice clothes, thank you very much.

Yes, it has been a long walk to freedom. There were difficult moments along the way, times when the garish, prisonlike aisles of storecrap seemed to close in, threatening to crush me physically and spiritually. But I never gave up hope. I always believed in my heart this day would come. I will never walk into Toys "R" Us again. I am free. Unless I have grandchildren.

               

         

1
Text Only
Community News Network

New England News
Obituaries
  • Jo Ann Hughes, 79

    Sandown, NH — Jo Ann (Phelps) Hughes of Sandown, New Hampshire passed away on Thursday, March 27, 2014, surrounded by all of her children at home. She was born in Little Bend Kentucky, to Beatrice (Shepherd) Phelps and John (Cat) Phelps in 1934. Jo Ann was predeceased by brothers, Marcus Phelps, Johnny Phelps, Forrest Phelps and sisters, Juanita Phelps, and Jeanette (Phelps) Vincent. She is survived by brother, Donald Quiggins of Georgia; sisters, Geneva (Phelps) Stanley of Kentucky, and Frances (Phelps) Bratcher of Tennessee who had just visited Jo Ann in September of 2013.

    Continued ...
    The Carriage Towne News Thu, April 10
    6 days
  • Margaret F. (Harrington) Kinney, 107

    Atkinson, NH — Margaret F. (Harrington) Kinney, 107, a resident of Atkinson for eighty-two years, died peacefully at her home surrounded by her loving family.

    Continued ...
    The Carriage Towne News Thu, April 03
    13 days 1 Photo
  • Laura L. Day, 79

    Newton, NH — Laura L. (Hartford) Day, 79, of Newton, NH, died Sunday evening, March 16, at Kindred Hospital, Peabody.

    Continued ...
    The Carriage Towne News Thu, March 27
    20 days
  • Norman Sansoucie, 77

    East Kingston, NH — Norman P. Sansoucie, 77, died on March 3, 2014, at the Clipper Harbor Nursing Home in Portsmouth, NH. He was born on May 29, 1936, in Haverhill, MA, son of William and Albertine (Beauparlant) Sansoucie.

    Continued ...
    The Carriage Towne News Thu, March 20
    27 days
  • John Colby, 76

    Brentwood, NH — John Ellsworth Colby, 76, formerly of Sandown, N.H., and Brownville, Maine, died on February 22, 2014, at the Rockingham County Nursing Home, after a lengthy illness. Born in Keene, N.H., Mr. Colby was the first son of the late Russell and Edythe Colby of Bradford, Mass. His brother, Dr. David R. Colby of Beaufort, N.C., predeceased him as well. Mr. Colby graduated in 1955 from Haverhill High School and attended Northeastern University and Wentworth Institute of Technology. He was a well known home designer and builder, and furniture craftsman, particularly known for his ability to create beautiful curved staircases. He was the founding production manager of both Westville Homes Corporation of Plaistow, N.H., and Xyloid Corporation of Greenville, Pa.,, pioneers in the modular home industry. He was also proprietor of the Westville Getty service station in Plaistow in the 1970s, and co-owner and occasional driver of the “1/5 Schenley Special” stock cars that raced, from 1968 to 1989, at Star in Epping, N.H., Lee, N.H., Hudson, N.H., and Westboro Mass., speedways.

    Continued ...
    The Carriage Towne News Thu, March 13
    34 days

Stocks