CarriageTowneNews.com, Kingston, NH

Z_CNHI News Service

January 28, 2014

Dating scene with colleges, recruits can have harsh results

On Feb. 5, the madness known as college football recruiting will cease - for next year's freshmen anyway. The best players will be handed a National Letter of Intent, sign it, and in some cases end a courtship that has lasted for more than four years.

It’s a great moment for those with desired athletic skills. They are envied by major universities who offer free educations just for a pledge to play football on Saturdays. But signing day can also be terrible for those kids who aren't equipped to handle the adulation, let alone make one of the biggest decisions of their lives.

College football recruiting has been compared to dating. Some matches seem perfect and work out. Others get off to a good start until one partner gets a wandering eye.

Before National Signing Day, student athletes may commit to a university. Their declarations sound permanent, even though we have learned they don't carry the force of law or even the stamp of one’s integrity. Social media is inundated with stories of “flippers and switchers,” ones who commit to one school, then jump to another.

One website that follows college football, Saturday Down South, reports there have been 60 de-commitments among prospects involving Southeastern Conference teams this fall - with more to follow. It’s no different for other conferences in other parts of the country.

Tom Lemming, a nationwide recruiting analyst, said the practice of de-commiting has become epidemic. There's no single explanation as to why.

Can you blame the high school phenom who just can’t get enough all-expense-paid trips to college campuses? Or do you blame recruiters whose teams' success - and their own livelihoods - depend on getting the right players?The answer is both.

Highly touted players are easily swayed by coaches with winning personalities and strong sales pitches. Absent the guidance of a parent or high school coach, a young player can quickly succumb to the pressure to commit.

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Obituaries
  • Alan J. Walker, 68

    Kingston, N.H. — Mr. Alan James Walker, 68, passed away peacefully at his home on July 8, 2014, after a long, brave battle with cancer.

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  • James Reese

    Raymond, NH — James Edwin Reese, 74, passed away on Wednesday, July 16, 2014, surrounded by his family and friends at his home in Raymond, N.H. He was the son of John and Ruth Reese, born on Oct. 29, 1939 in Edensburg, Pa. James graduated from Central Cambria High School in Pennsylvania before proudly serving in the U.S. Army as a food inspector. His military service was followed by 31 years with the U.S. Department of Agriculture as a meat inspector. Mr. Reese was an avid outdoorsman and spent much of his time fishing, camping and hiking in the White Mountains. He became involved in the Boy Scouts and enjoyed passing on his vast knowledge of the wilderness to others. Throughout his retirement years he enjoyed woodworking, raising rabbits and working in his garden.

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  • Velma J. Reid

    South Hampton, NH — Velma J. Reid, 80, died peacefully on July 17, 2014 at Exeter Hospital, surrounded by family. She was born in Haverhill, Mass. on June 8, 1934, the daughter of the late George C.W. and Alta I. (Kimball) Haynes. A graduate of Haverhill High School, Velma worked at Western Electric until she had children. For years, she was a devoted “stay-at-home” mom who raised her three children in a loving, nurturing environment. She later worked various manufacturing jobs until her retirement. After retiring, she volunteered her time at various organizations and was very involved at the East Kingston Community United Methodist Church as a member of the women’s guild, assisting with the holiday fair, and helping out wherever she could. She had a passion for animals, and would donate money, food, and blankets to the NH SPCA. She loved to sew and made a personalized quilt for every member of her family. She was also a member of the “Ugly Quilts” group, which made blankets and sleeping bags for the homeless using recycled fabric. She is survived by her husband, Clyde Reid of South Hampton, N.H.; daughter, Pam Eaton of Danville, N.H.; son and daughter-in-law, Douglas and Kim Reid of Raymond, N.H.; daughter, Shirley Reid of South Hampton, N.H.; two sisters, Gwen Stuart of Haverhill, and Norma Taplin of Dracut; four grandchildren, Cheryl and Marc Welch, and Kristen and Joshua Reid, and several nieces and nephews.

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  • Carleen A. Knowlton, 80

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  • Miriam O. (Graham) Graham, 84

    Kingston, NH — Miriam O. (Graham) Graham, 84, a resident of Kingston since 2001, and former longtime resident of Grafton, Mass., died peacefully, surrounded by her family, on July 11, 2014, following a long illness.

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