CarriageTowneNews.com, Kingston, NH

Z_CNHI News Service

February 4, 2014

Schedules may get longer, but basketball season seems shorter

How odd that the same weekend that featured the Super Blowout also offered the best the college basketball season has offered so far. Just as Sunday's Super Bowl turned into a dud between Seattle and Denver, collegians were giving fans one pulse-raising finish after another.

None was bigger than the Atlantic Coach Conference punch fest that had Syracuse defeating Duke 91-89 in overtime. “We’ve had a lot of games in here that have been great,” said Syracuse coach Jim Boeheim on TV afterwards. “But there’s never been a game as good as this one. I can’t say enough about the quality of this game."

Syracuse's win before nearly 36,000 fans came the same Saturday night that California knocked No. 1 Arizona from the unbeaten ranks, 60-58, on Justin Cobbs’ basket with less than a second left to play. Those two games were a fitting finish to a thrilling week that saw 13 teams in The Associated Press' Top 25 lose at least one game.

With football now packed away until next summer, it's time to enjoy what's become an all-too-brief college basketball season.

The long hoops schedule seems to get compressed - in terms of interest and relevance, if not the number of games themselves - for several reasons. One is that college basketball takes second-class status because it offers an unappealing list of early-season games. Then there's an ebb in importance in the conference tournaments and championships at the season's end because everyone is fixated on the drama-filled NCAA tournament.

All of this is a shame because college basketball players are some of the most gifted athletes around. Success requires power, grace, stamina, agility - and, finally, blending individual talents into a team.

Strangely, these ingredients that work so well for players can work against the best interest of the sport. Also limiting the luster of college basketball is the siphoning of its best rising stars. Multi-million dollar offers lure select freshmen and sophomores to the National Basketball Association and the chance to play against the world's best.

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Obituaries
  • Alan J. Walker, 68

    Kingston, N.H. — Mr. Alan James Walker, 68, passed away peacefully at his home on July 8, 2014, after a long, brave battle with cancer.

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  • James Reese

    Raymond, NH — James Edwin Reese, 74, passed away on Wednesday, July 16, 2014, surrounded by his family and friends at his home in Raymond, N.H. He was the son of John and Ruth Reese, born on Oct. 29, 1939 in Edensburg, Pa. James graduated from Central Cambria High School in Pennsylvania before proudly serving in the U.S. Army as a food inspector. His military service was followed by 31 years with the U.S. Department of Agriculture as a meat inspector. Mr. Reese was an avid outdoorsman and spent much of his time fishing, camping and hiking in the White Mountains. He became involved in the Boy Scouts and enjoyed passing on his vast knowledge of the wilderness to others. Throughout his retirement years he enjoyed woodworking, raising rabbits and working in his garden.

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  • Velma J. Reid

    South Hampton, NH — Velma J. Reid, 80, died peacefully on July 17, 2014 at Exeter Hospital, surrounded by family. She was born in Haverhill, Mass. on June 8, 1934, the daughter of the late George C.W. and Alta I. (Kimball) Haynes. A graduate of Haverhill High School, Velma worked at Western Electric until she had children. For years, she was a devoted “stay-at-home” mom who raised her three children in a loving, nurturing environment. She later worked various manufacturing jobs until her retirement. After retiring, she volunteered her time at various organizations and was very involved at the East Kingston Community United Methodist Church as a member of the women’s guild, assisting with the holiday fair, and helping out wherever she could. She had a passion for animals, and would donate money, food, and blankets to the NH SPCA. She loved to sew and made a personalized quilt for every member of her family. She was also a member of the “Ugly Quilts” group, which made blankets and sleeping bags for the homeless using recycled fabric. She is survived by her husband, Clyde Reid of South Hampton, N.H.; daughter, Pam Eaton of Danville, N.H.; son and daughter-in-law, Douglas and Kim Reid of Raymond, N.H.; daughter, Shirley Reid of South Hampton, N.H.; two sisters, Gwen Stuart of Haverhill, and Norma Taplin of Dracut; four grandchildren, Cheryl and Marc Welch, and Kristen and Joshua Reid, and several nieces and nephews.

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  • Carleen A. Knowlton, 80

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  • Miriam O. (Graham) Graham, 84

    Kingston, NH — Miriam O. (Graham) Graham, 84, a resident of Kingston since 2001, and former longtime resident of Grafton, Mass., died peacefully, surrounded by her family, on July 11, 2014, following a long illness.

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